18 Comments

  1. Jean
    March 3, 2016 @ 8:29 pm

    Thank you for the great ideas regarding positioning in photography. Very well explained and the photos showing the different angles were great. So helpful!

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      March 7, 2016 @ 6:33 pm

      I will try to do this more – where I use photos as examples. Thank you for reading Jean.

      Reply

  2. Gert
    March 3, 2016 @ 8:54 pm

    Hello Anthony. There is a lot of text to find on the internet of how to make better photos. But a very few with clear examples like you did in this article. It was ver helpfull for me Thanks a lot for sharing. Gert Schmitz

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      March 7, 2016 @ 6:32 pm

      You are most welcome Gert. Thank you so much for reading.

      Reply

  3. Patrick Surrena
    March 3, 2016 @ 10:29 pm

    Wonderful article, So well written conceived but more importantly the message of “how one sees” is much more important that “what kind of camera you have” and this article really says that. I like how ou think.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      March 7, 2016 @ 6:31 pm

      Thank you Patrick. That is music to my ears! I like how you compliment!!

      Reply

  4. Angie
    March 3, 2016 @ 11:30 pm

    Hello. Thank you for putting your time into sharing great knowledge. I thought I would comment that in the last example I actually liked the second last image over your chosen last image. I liked the portrait view of each of the four elements including the heavy railway criss cross. I found more to look at than in the simple lines of your final choice. Kind Regards

    Reply

    • Patrick Surrena
      March 4, 2016 @ 9:31 am

      I’m not sure I agree Angie. I like the way it was winowed down to finally the glass at the bottom (glass divided by a line) mimicks the windows in the building (glass divided by a line). With the train tracks and the tree–too much going on that while interesting, don’t give that final juxtaposition.

      Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      March 7, 2016 @ 6:31 pm

      I understand your preference for the portrait image. It’s not my favourite, but I understand -there is more to examine and it is a more curious shot. But, my ultimate goal is, mostly, to simplify and reduce the obvious (to me) when I can. Sometime I overdo it and find my image a bit “clinical”, That said, I still love them!

      Reply

  5. Sara
    March 4, 2016 @ 4:29 pm

    I loved your thought-provoking article, Tony. Clear and concise, with very good examples of the points you are making. I have forwarded it to my amateur photographer friends! Thank you.

    Reply

  6. Angie
    March 4, 2016 @ 9:33 pm

    Hello Patrick, Thank you for your comment. I re-visited Anthony’s images and re-considered taking into account your explanation. Personally I continue to prefer the second last image with four sections as it has more going on and holds my interest longer. I can see that the final image is simple with impact but one glance and I’m finished. (I agree, the trees in the railway criss cross are distracting). We are continually growing, and I appreciate the thought provoking that is happening with this article. Kind Regards

    Reply

    • Patrick Surrena
      March 4, 2016 @ 9:49 pm

      The great thing about photography (or art) is that there is no ONE right way. We all have our own interpretation Angie, and that’s the beauty of this.

      Reply

  7. Donna Roberge
    March 5, 2016 @ 3:07 am

    Very helpful article Anthony, I want to thank you for continuing to take the time to teach others. Your articles always inspire me! I particularly love the photo of the city from across the water with the dark clouds approaching and the photo taken in the early morning of the front of the brick building with the sun coming up behind the trees. Beautiful.

    Reply

    • Anthony Epes
      March 7, 2016 @ 6:24 pm

      I love teaching. I’m just bursting to share all I know. Thank you for reading.

      Reply

  8. Graham
    April 21, 2016 @ 4:53 am

    Great article thanks Anthony. Much food fro thought. I do tend to do this but to have it reinforced by another photographer is helpful to me.

    Reply

  9. Andrew McKinney
    January 2, 2017 @ 2:24 am

    Hi Anthony …. many, many thanks for your simple yet explicit explanations and examples in this article … the sign of a true teacher. Of late, I have found myself re-thinking and re-working scenes that have grabbed my attention … trying to capture what it is that grabbed my attention/what I feel. Your article has really helped me to define what this exercise is all about. Great food for thought!! Much appreciated! Andrew

    Reply

  10. Chad Manis
    January 13, 2017 @ 3:23 pm

    Anthony, you are an exceptional teacher. The best part of what you are presenting is your incredible “talk-me-through” of the creative process, step-by-step. Very informative and instructive!

    Reply

  11. Yves Gagné
    April 22, 2017 @ 4:37 am

    We are going on a trip to Ireland, so I bought a book from a Montréal photographer, to get some ideas, prior to our trip. He basically said the same thing, change your point of view, try a different focal length, etc. Mode around.
    So a lot in this article, is foot for thought.
    The most important one, not beeing lazy.

    Thank you.

    Reply

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